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Technical Knifemaking - Doug Ayen's Blacksmithing Blog [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
Doug Ayen

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Technical Knifemaking [Dec. 17th, 2008|10:08 pm]
Doug Ayen
Technical Knifemaking

(an unedited first draft outline)

philosophy
importance of quality
importance of originality
importance of accuracy
importance of precision
stop when done (diminishing returns on extra work)
Design
always draw before starting the work.
CAD
historical reproduction
archaometallugy/styles of ironmaking by period/location
accuracy
markings
research
Safety
hazardous materials
physical safety
you're going to get cut, burnt, and abraded. deal
forging
how forging works
molecular scale explanation
importance of control
too hot, too cold
hammers and anvils
guilliteen tool
let it fall
basic shaping
basic welding
lamination
pattern welding
laminate
matrix
waterjet mosaic
stainless steel damascus
laminate
mixed powder patternmaking
welding in the box
forge thick, grind thin
decarb
better patterns in layered materials
quenching
gotchas to watch out for while forging
cottage cheese when too hot
cracks when too cold
anealing box care, feeding, and use
spatter, drips, and being on fire
radiant heat dangers
sound and its remediation
Materials
specifications
sources
Tools
lathe, milling machine, surface grinder
belt grinders
hand tools
measuring
CNC
hydraulic press
rolling mill
power hammers
forges
anvils
kilns
making your own equipment
designing
Process
Casting
furnaces & construction
molding
brass/bronze
steel
ceramic shell
Standards
QA
heat treatment
molten salt pot
hardening and quenching/tempering pots
bainite
sword straightening post-treatment
controlled environment
kiln
"primitive" precision
watching the shadows in the steel in the long fire
oil-bath tempering
laminates
my-carta
working with carbon fiberglas etc
mokume gane
exotic materials
ceramics
glass
sapphire
wrought iron
steelmaking
making your own precision alloys
cpm
crucible melt
designing an alloy
knapping materials
stainless damascus
wootz
titanium
pattern welding titanium
explosive bonding
scaling up
research
linkReply

Comments:
[User Picture]From: corivax
2008-12-18 04:43 am (UTC)
That is an impressively large list! Books could be written on some of those single items. :)
(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: blackanvil
2008-12-19 05:03 pm (UTC)
Oh, yeah. Books have been written on several of these topics -- which I intend to reference and direct the reader at. Mostly, though, I'd like to work my way through most of these, documenting as I go.

I'll probably fail, but its good to have goals, no?

--doug
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: persis
2008-12-18 04:49 am (UTC)
wow!
(Reply) (Thread)
From: tjic
2008-12-18 03:33 pm (UTC)

great blog

Hi,

I was wasting time at work the other day and decided to google "blacksmithing blog". You came up at the top.

Damn you!

I spent about two hours reading back through your entire blog history.

Fascinating stuff!

I'm going to be taking a blacksmithing intro class at Prospect Hill Forge in Waltham, MA in January.

Anyway, just wanted to say Hi and tell you to keep up with the blogging!

P.S. It was also weird to see that I peripherally know some folks (Arisia people) that leave comments in your blog.



Travis J I Corcoran, President
SmartFlix

--
http://SmartFlix.com/
web's biggest how-to DVD rental store




(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: madbodger
2008-12-19 07:18 pm (UTC)
sapphire?
my-carta?
And the audiophools are heavily into explosively laminated multilayer sheets.

(Reply) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: blackanvil
2008-12-19 11:02 pm (UTC)
Yeah, I was looking at machinable ceramics online, comparing the various stats, and realized that sapphire is both hard, tough, fairly resilliant, and of course pretty. It would have to be worked with diamond, but imagine a transparent knife, all glittery and sharp . . .
my-carta is homemade micarta, aka laminated cloth, paper, or similar thin sheets. I've actually made some, which turned out ok, and just bought some supplies to make some more (I'm thinking black velvet, or silk. Or silk velvet.)

Yeah. RS keeps reminding me that I really don't have the space to set up an explosive lamination shop (no place to store the explosives), but maybe if I buy some land out in the middle of nowhere, or an old iron mine, or convince the folk over at the local quarry to let me set up there . . .


--doug
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)